Engaging with stakeholders

G4:

G4-24
List of stakeholder groups engaged by organisation
G4-25
Basis for identification and selection of stakeholders with whom to engage
G4-26
Organisation’s approach to stakeholder engagement, including frequency of engagement by type and by stakeholder group, and an indication of whether any of the engagement was undertaken specifically as part of the report preparation process
G4-27
Key topics and concerns that have been raised through stakeholder engagement, and how the organisation has responded to those key topicsand concerns, including through its reporting, and the stakeholder groups that raised each of the key topics and concerns
G4-S02
Operations with significant actual or potential negative impacts on local communities

COMMUNICATION AND ENGAGEMENT

In line with its Corporate Communications and Engagement Strategy, Sibanye communicates with key stakeholders on a regular basis to keep them informed of developments.

The development of the Corporate Communications and Engagement Strategy entailed:

  • a review of the existing communications framework and practices;
  • an external environmental scan;
  • the development of communications and engagement objectives and guiding principles; and
  • the establishment of monitoring, evaluation and performance management arrangements.

The strategy developed in 2013 will remain under review and is a dynamic document to be updated from time to time.

Sibanye’s engagement strategy is based on six objectives, supporting the delivery of its corporate objectives, which are to:

1. Promote the Sibanye brand

  • Position and strengthen the brand among key stakeholders
  • Inculcate the Group pay-off line – ‘We are one’ – as a philosophy to engender a sense of ownership and accountability necessary to realise its vision
  • Build brand awareness and legitimacy
  • Achieve sustainable brand value

2. Build credibility and trust in Sibanye

  • Influence and work alongside stakeholders to deliver on its vision
  • Deliver on its promises

3. Build a new corporate culture for Sibanye by increasing awareness of its vision, mission, aims, objectives and values

  • Employees are aligned with the Group’s purpose, vision and values and understand what is needed of them to make a meaningful contribution
  • Employee engagement and achievement of organisational effectiveness

4. Improve communications and engagement capability and capacity of staff across the organisation and ensure resources are used to maximum effect

  • Building capability among the communications staff is central to achieving the objectives of the Communications and Engagement Strategy
  • Achievement of vision hinges on every manager becoming a communicating leader

5. Establish two-way internal communication across the Group

  • Checking that messages reach internal target audiences and employees, and closing the loop to ensure that messages are understood and internalised
  • Providing an opportunity for employee contribution
  • Ensuring clarity on management’s role in communication

6. Provide high-quality, efficient and effective communication and engagement between Sibanye and external communities

  • Influence and work alongside key stakeholders
  • Ensure understanding of the Sibanye portfolio of projects and impacts on communities
  • Consistent messaging to stakeholders

SIBANYE’S PRIMARY STAKEHOLDERS

Stakeholder groups

Local and provincial government

Some specific stakeholders

  • West Rand District Municipality
  • Westonaria Local Municipality
  • Merafong Local Municipality
  • Matjhabeng Local Municipality
  • Masilonyana Local Municipality
  • Lejweleputswa District Municipality
  • Gauteng Provincial Government
  • Free State Provincial Government

National government

Some specific stakeholders

  • Department of Mineral Resources (DMR)
  • Department of Labour (DoL)
  • Department of Education (DoE)
  • Department of Higher Education
  • Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA)
  • Department of Water Affairs (DWA)
  • Department of Health (DoH)
  • Department of Rural Development and Land Reform
  • Portfolio Committee on Mineral Resources
  • National Treasury

Non-governmental organisations (NGOs)

Some specific stakeholders

  • Wildlife and Environment Society of South Africa
  • Earthlife Africa
  • Federation for a Sustainable Environment
  • Groundwork South Africa

Forums/key institutions

Some specific stakeholders

  • Chamber of Mines of South Africa
  • Suppliers/contractors
  • West Rand District Mining Forum
  • Merafong Community Mining Forum
  • Far West Rand Dolomitic Water Association

Organised labour

Some specific stakeholders

  • NUM
  • Solidarity
  • UASA
  • AMCU
  • Sibanye Group Leadership Forum

Regulators

Some specific stakeholders

  • DMR
  • DWA
  • DEA
  • National Nuclear Regulator (NNR)
  • National Energy Regulator of South Africa
  • JSE
  • NYSE/US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)

Communities

Some specific stakeholders

  • Tin City
  • Kokosi
  • Theunissen
  • Welkom
  • Virginia
  • Blybank
  • Hillshaven
  • Glenharvie
  • Fochville
  • Bekkersdal
  • Simunye
  • Farmers/landowners

Media

Some specific stakeholders

  • National media
  • Regional newspapers and broadcasters
  • Local newspapers and broadcasters
  • Specialist trade media
  • Information websites
  • Community media

Other

Some specific stakeholders

  • Sibanye Board of directors
  • Employees
  • Sibanye Executive Committee (Exco)
  • Investors/providers of capital (shareholders and banks)
  • Retired employees
  • Families of employees
  • Mining units
  • Board committees (particularly Safety, Health and Sustainable Development, Social and Ethics, Audit and Risk)

STAKEHOLDER MAP

Local/provincial government

Primary interest areas Methods of engagement
and communication
Frequency Responsible person/team
  • Strategic direction
  • Business performance
  • Social issues
  • Environmental issues
  • Compliance to licence
  • Governance
  • Human rights
Official briefings Quarterly CEO/Vice President:
Sustainable Development
Councillor/Member of the Executive Council
(MEC) briefings
As required CEO/Chief Operating Officer/
Sustainable Development team
Event launches Ad hoc Sustainable Development team
VIP visits As requiredCEO
Presentations As requiredSustainable Development team

National government

Primary interest areas Methods of engagement
and communication
Frequency Responsible person/team
  • Strategic direction
  • Business performance
  • Social issues
  • Environmental issues
  • Compliance to licence
  • Governance
  • Safety
  • Human rights
Official briefings As required CEO/Vice President:
Sustainable Development
VIP visits As required CEO/Vice President:
Sustainable Development

Regulators

Primary interest areas Methods of engagement
and communication
Frequency Responsible person/team
  • Strategic direction
  • Business performance
  • Social issues
  • Environmental issues
  • Compliance to licence
  • Governance
  • Safety
  • Human rights
Official briefings As required CEO/Vice President:
Sustainable Development
Presentations Quarterly Sustainable Development team
Site inspections Annually Sustainable Development team
Reports Annually Sustainable Development team
Event launches Ad hoc Sustainable Development /
communications
VIP visits As required CEO

Organised labour

Primary interest areas Methods of engagement
and communication
Frequency Responsible person/team
  • Strategic direction
  • Business performance
  • Social issues
  • Environmental issues
  • Compliance to licence
  • Governance
  • Safety
  • Company policies
  • Human rights
CEO brief Monthly Communications
Group leadership forum Monthly Employee Relations
Incident report Monthly Safety
Intranet Ongoing Communications
Union briefing Ongoing Union
Staff roadshows Ongoing Communications

NGOs

Primary interest areas Methods of engagement
and communication
Frequency Responsible person/team
  • Strategic direction
  • Social issues
  • Environmental issues
  • Compliance to licence
  • Governance
  • Safety
  • Human rights
Official briefings Quarterly Sustainable Development team
Online: website Ongoing Communications
Site visits Ongoing Sustainable Development team

Forums/key institutions

Primary interest areas Methods of engagement
and communication
Frequency Responsible person/team
  • Strategic direction
  • Business performance
  • Social issues
  • Environmental issues
  • Compliance to licence
  • Governance
  • Safety
  • Company policies
  • Human rights
Formal briefings As required CEO/Vice President:
Sustainable Development
Presentations As required Sustainable Development team
Reports Ongoing Sustainable Development team

Communities

Primary interest areas Methods of engagement
and communication
Frequency Responsible person/team
  • Strategic direction
  • Business performance
  • Social issues
  • Environmental issues
  • Compliance to licence
  • Governance
  • Safety
  • Human rights
Town hall meetings As required Communications/
Sustainable Development
Local newspapers Ongoing Communications
Consultation event As required Sustainable Development team
Leaflets Ongoing Communications
Roadshows As required Sustainable Development team
Event launches Ad hoc Communications
Local radio Ongoing Communications

Employees

Primary interest areas Methods of engagement
and communication
Frequency Responsible person/team
  • Strategic direction
  • Business performance
  • Social issues
  • Environmental issues
  • Compliance to licence
  • Governance
  • Safety
  • Company policies
  • Human rights
Induction At start Line manager
Team briefings Weekly Line manager
Intranet Ongoing Communications
CEO brief Monthly Communications
Staff roadshows Quarterly Communications

Board of directors and investors

Primary interest areas Methods of engagement
and communication
Frequency Responsible person/team
  • Strategic direction
  • Business performance
  • Social issues
  • Environmental issues
  • Compliance to licence
  • Governance
  • Safety
  • Company policies
  • Human rights
Union briefing As required Union
Board meetings Quarterly Company Secretary
Committees Quarterly Company Secretary
Annual General Meeting
(AGM)
Annually Company Secretary
Online: website Ongoing Communications
Board papers Quarterly Company Secretary

Media

Primary interest areas Methods of engagement
and communication
Frequency Responsible person/team
  • Strategic direction
  • Business performance
  • Social issues
  • Environmental issues
  • Compliance to licence
  • Governance
  • Safety
  • Human rights
Press releases As required Communications
Features/interviews As required Communications
Press briefings As required Communications
Event invites As required Communications
AGM Annually Communications
Online: website As required Communications
Social media As required Communications
Press releases As required Communications

Case study: Land-use survey maps stakeholders

A land-use survey initially aimed at meeting the requirements of the International Cyanide Management Code for the manufacture, transport and use of cyanide in the production of gold (the Cyanide Code) has become a more useful exercise than initially expected – Sibanye was able to engage with an important group of stakeholders in developing plans to safeguard the broader, current and future interests of the farming community in the vicinity of its operations.

The initial survey conducted in 2009, which only focused on areas adjacent to water bodies, was extended in 2013 to cover all land users within 15km of the property perimeter. The 2013 survey covered 72 farms in the Wonderfonteinspruit, Kraalkopspruit, Loopspruit and Leeuspruit catchment areas of Gauteng where Sibanye mines. It thus created an extensive database of stakeholders.

“In terms of the Cyanide Code, stakeholders must be kept informed about any possible cyanide-related issues arising from mining activities,” states Tharina Naude, Sustainable Development Unit Manager: Land and Biodiversity for Sibanye. “We need to have their contact details and knowledge of their activities and water use on particular tracts of land in order to proactively address any concerns and avoid serious incidents.”

The survey also served as a vehicle to discuss and develop appropriate emergency procedures with parties who could be affected, she adds. “In the process of collecting the data, we were able to determine the long-term agricultural or commercial prospects of the farming community. Sibanye is thus able to develop a workable and acceptable landmanagement plan, to flag other potential pollution sources or issues that neighbouring communities might encounter, and it assists us with planning for future local economic development (LED) projects.”

The maps developed from the land-use survey have also informed Sibanye’s stakeholder-engagement strategy, Naude points out. “The stakeholder database, which has emerged from the survey, is an integral tool in our effective engagement with stakeholders. The next step is to plot all the areas we have surveyed on a geographic information system, which will quickly show every landowner’s details and activities. Concerns raised will also be identified and addressed.”

Engaging with stakeholders: Prof Les Stoch, acid mine drainage (AMD) specialist and agriculturalist on the Far West Rand

“The concern about the future of the groundwater dates from 1948 and coincided with the commencement of pumping from the newly established West Driefontein mine. My involvement stems from September 1956 when the Welverdiend farmers were without irrigation water due to limited flow from the spring at Oberholzer. Since then, I have acted on behalf of the farmers who were at odds with the mines and received limited support from the authorities when the Oberholzer spring ran dry in 1959 – and soon ran into pollution problems. The spring at Bank dried up in 1968 due to the flood at West Driefontein. The farmers were, therefore, totally dependent on the water discharged by the mines. A solution was grudgingly accommodated by what we considered to be arrogant mine bosses and, by 1972, 85% of those affected had been compensated. The problems recurred in the late 1990s and it was back to the trenches. After the initial skirmishes, we found ourselves negotiating with a different class of senior management, Ian Cockerill, and the late Brendan Walker. The solution was based on reciprocal trust and both sides were satisfied with the outcome: a rare victory. What I consider to be a rare compliment was when Walker asked me, as an agriculturist, to be involved in a large hydroponics project that Gold Fields intended to launch. The next task was to negotiate the purchase of the farm West Driefontein for the mine. The odds were lined up against success as 52 signatures were required from family members who did not trust each other and, initially, refused to communicate.

“If asked whether the farmers have any problems with the mining industry, my response would be that, those who have material issues and are prepared to present facts to the mining industry, their concerns will be dealt with sympathetically and on merit. In my more than 50 years of engagement with the mining industry, all the issues that I raised were settled to the satisfaction of both sides, except for one instance where the mine in question kept changing owners and, I would believe, that a solution is pending.”

Engaging with stakeholders: Mariette Liefferink, CEO of the Federation for a Sustainable Environment

“I have seen a paradigm shift in recent years. Instead of focusing on unrelated conservation issues, mining companies, including Sibanye, are now concentrating on specifics. We interact on environmental and social issues, and they are very transparent. Sibanye does not just listen but takes action.

“My role is to ensure that communities know their rights and how to exercise those rights. At the same time, I manage the unrealistic expectations and narrow self-interest of individuals within communities. It would be unfair, unjust and inequitable to expect the last man standing to carry the impact of more than 120 years of mining so I conduct presentations to high-level international delegations on the legacy of mining, focusing on the positive aspects of Sibanye’s presence.

“Consultation is not a one-way street – we listen to each other, consider advice offered and then work together towards the common good.”

Engaging with stakeholders: Albie Nieuwoudt, executive director: Economic Development & Planning, Merafong City Local Municipality

“With the unbundling of Sibanye, we have had to establish new relationships since August/September 2013, but we meet regularly to agree on Social and Labour Plan (SLP) projects that must align with the Integrated Development Plans (IDPs) of the municipality.

“We uphold transparency in our engagement with each other – Sibanye invites us to DMR meetings for planning purposes, as well as audits and discussions on SLP amendments. Monthly implementing meetings review progress in the implementation of SLP projects.

“Our communication with Sibanye is conducted through two committees: an Implementing Committee and a Mandating Committee. Top mine management sits at implementing level with senior management of the municipality and politicians. Sibanye’s role is to identify and implement the projects, as well as the charters and the business case, and then obtain approval at mandating level. The Mandating Committee comprises the head of LED at Sibanye who sits in on meetings with the Executive Mayor of the municipality.

“Legislation does not provide for targets or percentages but we have motivated the DMR to strive for agreement in terms of equitable distribution of resources, which would be beneficial to the mines and host communities.”